The CDC has revised its COVID-19 recommendations around which activities are safe for fully vaccinated people. New CDC guidance says that If you’re fully vaccinated, you can resume activities that you did prior to the pandemic—without wearing a mask or physically distancing. However, there are exceptions in which even fully vaccinated people are still required to wear masks and socially distance, including:

  • In healthcare settings, such as when visiting your doctor, a hospital or a long-term care facility such as a nursing home
  • On public transportation, such as when traveling by bus, train or plane
  • In transportation hubs, including bus stations and airports

If you are unsure of the masking requirements at any given destination, be it a grocery store or a tropical island, be sure to check before you go and carry a mask just in case.

Chosing Safer Activities chart


Fully vaccinated or unvaccinated: which activities are safest?

You are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after your second dose in a two-dose series, such as Moderna and Pfizer, and two weeks after a single-dose vaccine such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine. If neither of these apply to you, regardless of your age, you are not fully vaccinated and should continue taking all COVID-19 safety precautions until you are vaccinated.

The following information from the CDC will help you choose safer activities based on your vaccination status. Where it’s indicated that you should take prevention measures, these include wearing a mask, staying six feet apart and washing your hands.

Examples of outdoor activities:

  • Walk, run, wheelchair roll or bike outdoors with members of your family
    • Safest for both vaccinated and unvaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
  • Attend a small, outdoor gathering with fully vaccinated family and friends
    • Safest for both vaccinated and unvaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
  • Attend a small, outdoor gathering with fully vaccinated and unvaccinated people
    • Safest for fully vaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
    • Less safe for unvaccinated people—take prevention measures
  • Dine at an outdoor restaurant with friends from multiple households
    • Safest for both vaccinated and unvaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
    • Least safe for unvaccinated people—take prevention measures

Examples of indoor activities:

  • Visit a barber or hair salon
    • Safest for fully vaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
    • Less safe for unvaccinated people—take prevention measures
  • Go to an uncrowded, indoor shopping center or museum
    • Safest for fully vaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
    • Less safe for unvaccinated people—take prevention measures
  • Attend a small, indoor gathering of fully vaccinated and unvaccinated people from multiple households
    • Safest for fully vaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
    • Less safe for unvaccinated people—take prevention measures
  • Go to an indoor movie theater
    • Safest for both vaccinated and unvaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
    • Least safe for unvaccinated people—take prevention measures
  • Sing in an indoor chorus
    • Safest for both vaccinated and unvaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
    • Least safe for unvaccinated people—take prevention measures
  • Attend a full-capacity worship service
    • Safest for both vaccinated and unvaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
    • Least safe for unvaccinated people—take prevention measures
  • Eat at an indoor restaurant or bar
    • Safest for both vaccinated and unvaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
    • Least safe for unvaccinated people—take prevention measures
  • Participate in an indoor, high-intensity exercise class
    • Safest for both vaccinated and unvaccinated people—prevention measures not needed
    • Least safe for unvaccinated people—take prevention measures

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