At Medical City North Hills, we are committed to your comfort throughout your stay. As part of this commitment, we're pleased to offer our acclaimed menu service. Our menu has been developed by our team of registered dietitians and our executive chef to meet your nutritional needs as well as your culinary desires.

How does Meal Service work?

Once your physician has ordered your diet prescription it is our goal to visit you personally to take your meal selections. A food service ambassador or Nurse will provide you with a menu tailored to your diet.

If your diet changes throughout your stay, your food service ambassador or nurse will provide you with a menu that reflects your new diet. Your food service ambassador will visit you daily to assist you with meal selections anytime from 10:30am to 12:30pm. If we miss you, please call us at *51651 or (817) 255-1651 to place your order. It is our mission to provide the best service and highest quality food to aide in your healing.

Cafeteria hours for guests

Monday - Friday

  • Breakfast- 7:00am - 9:00am
  • Lunch- 11:00am - 2:00pm

Dinner and Weekends - CLOSED

Food is also available through our Fresh Smart vending machines in the front lobby.

Guest trays can be purchased in the cafeteria during cafeteria hours. Present your receipt to the food service ambassador or call us at *51651 or (817) 255-1651 to place your order. Cost is $10 per meal. You can prepay for as many as you like.

Menus

Regular diet (English and Spanish)

The basics of good nutrition:

  • Limit foods high in saturated fat, such as full-fat milk products and fatty meats.
  • Eat two servings of baked or grilled fish, such as salmon or tuna, each week.
  • Eat a variety of grain products, preferably whole grains such as oat bran, whole-wheat bread and barley.
  • Limit sodium intake to less than 2,400 mg per day by limiting the salt shaker, canned foods and processed foods.

View Regular Diet Menu

Bite size soft and chopped

A bite size soft and chopped mechanical soft diet limits foods that are hard to chew or swallow. This diet may be recommended following certain surgeries or illnesses, if you have difficulty chewing due to lack of teeth, or have decreased swallowing ability.

  • Avoid nuts, seeds, tough meats and meat with skin and bones.
  • Meat should be chopped or ground, and food should be moist.
  • Foods should be in bite sized pieces.
  • Avoid raw fruits and vegetables and breads. Instead, include well cooked vegetables and canned fruits.
  • Avoid chewy or hard breads.

View Bite Size Soft and Chopped Menu

Consistent carbohydrate

In both diabetes mellitus type I and II, the pancreas is inefficient or unable to produce enough insulin to help maintain blood sugar control. The diet for diabetes focuses on maintaining consistent amounts or servings of carbohydrate containing foods at each meal to help promote normal blood sugar levels.

Carbohydrates are found in the following groups:

  • Starch Group: grains (bread, pasta, rice, cereal), starchy vegetables (potato, corn, peas) and legumes (dried beans, pea and lentils)
  • Fruit Group: fresh, canned, dried and juices
  • Milk Group: milk and yogurt
  • Sweets, Desserts and Other Carbohydrates Group: sugar, honey, desserts, sodas, etc.

A well-balanced diet can also assist in blood sugar control. Consume meals containing protein, carbohydrate, and unsaturated fat.

A serving of carbohydrate has 15 grams of carbohydrate. When meal planning, most adults will have between 3 to 5 servings of carbohydrates.

Utilize the food label to help determine the number of carbohydrates that a particular food item contains. Read the carbohydrates listed beside "Total Carbohydrates" as sugar is included in this number.

Make sure to include fiber in your daily diet as this has been shown to have a positive effect on good blood sugar control.

View Consistent Carbohydrate Menu

Heart healthy

A cardiac diet may be recommended for individuals with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, high triglycerides, and /or high cholesterol.

This type of diet is considered "heart healthy" and focuses on limiting saturated/trans fats, cholesterol, and sodium.

In addition to restricting fat and cholesterol, sodium should be limited to 2,400mg daily. This amounts to approximately one teaspoon of salt per day!

Sodium is naturally lower in fresh food items such as fresh vegetables versus canned vegetables since manufacturers often add salt to processed foods. It is important to read the nutrition label on commercially prepared foods.

View Heart Healthy Menu

Minced and ground

A minced and ground diet limits the foods that are hard to chew or swallow. This diet may be recommended following certain surgeries or illnesses, if you have difficulty chewing due to lack of teeth, or have decreased swallowing ability.

  • Avoid nuts, seeds, tough meats and meat with skin and bones.
  • Meat should be ground, and food should be moist.
  • Avoid breads, pancakes, French toast and other bread products.
  • Avoid raw fruits and vegetables. Instead, include well cooked vegetables and canned fruits.
  • Avoid chewy or hard breads.

View Minced and Ground Menu

Renal

A renal diet limits the amount of potassium, phosphorus, sodium, fluid, and sometimes protein in the diet.

  • Potassium is found mostly in fruits and vegetables.
  • High phosphorus levels in the blood can make bones weak over time. Focusing on consuming foods low in phosphorus in the diet can help.
  • Avoid foods high in fluid levels: soups, fruits, ice creams if a fluid restriction is prescribed.
  • If you are receiving dialysis you will need extra protein, example of ways to increase your protein include eggs, meat, protein powder, and oral supplements.

Avoid foods high in sodium to help decreased fluid

View Renal Menu